Attendance Allowance and Pension Age Disability Payment in Scotland

About Attendance Allowance and Pension Age Disability Payment

Attendance Allowance is a non-means tested benefit for people aged 66 or over who need help with their personal care because of a physical, mental or cognitive disability.  It is paid at two rates depending on whether you need help daytime, night-time or both.  

There are special rules about Attendance Allowance if you are terminally ill Attendance Allowance: How to claim – GOV.UK (www.gov.uk)

You cannot claim Attendance Allowance if you already receive Disability Living Allowance,  Personal Independence Payment or Adult Disability Payment.

Attendance Allowance does not provide any assistance with mobility needs. You may qualify for benefits such as Pension Credit, or an increase in your Pension Credit, if you get Attendance Allowance so get a benefit check to find out what will happen if your claim succeeds. You can use Age Scotland’s online benefit calculator here Benefit Calculator (agescotland.org.uk)

Attendance Allowance is one of the benefits that is being devolved to Scotland; from October 2024 some people will need to claim Pension Age Disability Payment instead of Attendance Allowance.   You can find information about Pension Age Disability Payment and when you can claim it in your area here New disability benefit for pensioners – gov.scot (www.gov.scot)

If you already receive Attendance Allowance you will automatically be moved on to Pension Age Disability Payment; the transfer process will start in early 2025.

 

Eligibility

You can get Attendance Allowance if you’re 66 or over and:

  • you have a physical disability, sensory, mental, learning or cognitive disability and 
  • your disability means that you need help caring for yourself or someone to supervise you, for your own or someone else’s safety

You must also:

  • be in Great Britain when you claim – there are some exceptions such as  members and family members of the Armed Forces
  • have been in Great Britain for at least 2 of the last 3 years
  • be habitually resident in the UK, Ireland, Isle of Man or the Channel Islands
  • not be subject to immigration control (unless you’re a sponsored immigrant)

There are some exceptions to these conditions depending on where you live. 

When Pension Age Disability Payment is introduced most of the rules will be the same as for Attendance Allowance, but rules about how long you need to have lived in Scotland to qualify, and the rules about terminal illness, will be different. 

 

How to claim Attendance Allowance

Call the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) Attendance Allowance helpline. 

Tel: 0800 731 0122
Text: 0800 731 0317

 They will then send you an information pack and self-assessment form. It is important to include as much detailed information about your care needs as you can.

Attendance Allowance can be backdated to the date of your phone call if you return the claim pack within 6 weeks. 

If you do not agree with the decision about your Attendance Allowance get advice from a specialist welfare benefits adviser. 

When Pension Age Disability Payment is introduced you will claim it from Social Security Scotland Social Security Scotland – Homepage

Useful Contacts

Information last updated on 13 May 2024. Please note that information may be subject to change. All information is provided in good faith but Disability Information Scotland does not endorse any product or service referred to within this resource.

If you would like this information guide in another version then please contact us and we will post or email you a copy.

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